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Book Review and Giveaway Girl Within Girl Book 2: Healing

Title: Girl Within Girl Book 2: Healing

Author: S.P. Aruna

Genre: Erotic Thriller

Trapped in a mountain cabin with three, possible four, women….every guy’s dream, right? Or could it turn out to be a nightmare?

Dr. Sean Paisley needs to find out how to bring these women together – his survival depends on it. To make matters worse, he’s in love with all of them….made passionate love to all of them. Throw in a nasty grizzly bear and the dark forces of the government and the situation becomes even more dire.

In the end, he was stuck with Belinda, a hysterical, suicidal, homicidal maniac of a person, confined together in the wilderness of the onset of winter. Now both their lives are at stake.

 

Review: This was an interesting book, not what I expected but it was a fun read all the same. Dr. Sean Paisley is stuck in a mountain cabin with several women… And although that might sound like any guy’s dream, it isn’t, because he’s in love with all of them, has even made love to all of them, and they all like him too – not exactly an ideal situation.

Once I started reading I had trouble stopping, and I really enjoyed the book.

 

 

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Book Review Redfern

Title: Redfern

Author: Gary Tinnams

Genre: Science Fiction

“Humans don’t project past their own frequency. It’s why you’re so isolated as a species. The beings of other frequencies can only witness what you build and feel what you destroy.”

Earth – Tomorrow – The Singularity:-

The machines have taken over and mankind is cast out.

Millennia later, the inhospitable planet of Redfern is in the process of being made habitable for the proposed rebirth of the entire human race. All is proceeding as planned until Enforcer, Ted Holloway, witnesses the unexpected appearance of a long dead and former friend – A man who can become invisible and immaterial, a man that can penetrate any and all security.

A man whose very existence should be impossible.

As Ted and his superior, Lisa Carmichael, investigate further, they face dangers and creatures that challenge their very concept of reality and also encounter the colony’s caretaker Machine Mind and the human Security Commissioner, both of whom have opposing and intricate agendas of their own.

For the true nature of Redfern is stranger and more deadly than anything Holloway or Carmichael can possibly imagine.

And it could change or destroy humanity forever…

Review: What impressed me the most  about Redfern was the writing style. It was fluent and still managed to tell the reader enough details to picture every scene. The characters felt like real people, epsecially Ted and Lisa. The story is very creative, and the plot keeps surprising the reader.

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Book Review No Quarter: Wenches

Title: No Quarter: Wenches – Volume 1

Author: MJL Evans

Genre: Historical Romance

Volume 1 of 6 begins in 1689 Port Royal, Jamaica, where Atia Crisp is imprisoned, awaiting trial, while refugees from Strangewayes’s plantation seek their new home. Guided by Capitaine la Roche, they face pursuit by the pirate hunter Big Dick and the perilous terrain of Bocas del Toro. Their future home of Sérénité hangs in the balance, complicated by the outbreak of war with France.

Series Description:

The adventures from No Quarter: Dominium continue with wenches! In 1689, Atia Crisp finds herself imprisoned in the wickedest city on earth, Port Royal, Jamaica, while the refugees from Strangewayes’s plantation in the Blue Mountains are on the run and seeking a new home, deep in the Caribbean. Captain Jean-Paul la Roche must get them to safety and find a way to liberate the woman he loves while waging a war against the English with the pirate Laurens de Graaf.

While besieged people suffer and starve, a group of women form a secret and illegal society deep from within the bowels of the city called: WENCH. A network that deals with smugglers, merchants, cutthroats and thieves. Dragged into the struggle for supremacy of the Caribbean, the women are divided and find themselves engulfed in bloodshed. The pirates of Port Royal and former enemies may be their only hope of escape.

Hell hath no fury like a cross wench!

A romance novel set in 1689 in Port Royal, an era I’m not familiar with but that I enjoyed learning more about. Atia Crisp is an interesting character to read about, and the historical setting was described in such detail I could imagine myself there. Fans of historical romance will enjoy this book.

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Book Review Eidolons

eidolons-coverTitle: Eidolons

Author: Harrison Fountain

Genre: Literary Fantasy

When TK dies in a car accident, the Grim Reaper gives him a second chance at life, but he says it’s more fun being a ghost. As he haunts his small Iowa town, his sleek shell of sarcasm cracks to a terrified lonely inner self. Find out why he’d rather be dead.

I don’t want to spoil anything (the blurb is short, so basically just about anything outside of that is a spoiler) but some very unexpected things happen to TK once he’s dead, and I never really quite knew what direction the book was going to take, which I loved.

The writing was the strongest part of the book for me. As an editor, I’m always on the lookout for errors or clumsy sentences, but the writing here was great.

If you think you’re in for a standard, stereotypical “person dies, becomes a ghost” story then you’ll be surprised at what Eidolons has to offer.

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Book Review War Town

wartowncover-finalTitle: War Town

Author: Mitch Goth

Genre: New Adult Thriller

For Olly Rourke, War Town’s opening day is a joyous occasion. He is one of a thousand people selected to be the first players in the world’s largest paintball arena. But as he soon finds out, the game he enters into is far more sinister. Two equal teams, locked in the massive arena together, and presented with an armory of real ammunition and a time bomb powerful enough to kill them all. The only way out is to eliminate the other team, by any means necessary.

What is supposed to be a regular paintball game, except played in the world’s largest arena, turns out to be much more deadly. Olly Rourke, the protagonist, has to decide what he’s willing to do to survive, if the only way to get out of that arena alive is to eliminate the other team, by any means necessary. The game turns deadly and the stakes are extremely high in this fast-paced thriller.

 

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Book Review The Resistance: Duchess

book-cover-duchessTitle: The Resistance: Duchess

Author: Kristyn Stone

Genre: YA Fantasy

In this second book of The Resistance series Garritt’s twin Baylee takes center stage. Baylee has a hard time being a leprechaun, but when she is captured, she must figure out if she wants to be a normal teenager, an elf for her people or a ruler of leprechauns and elves.

Damon is in love, and even though what he did was wrong, he did it for all the right reasons. When Baylee disappears in front of his eyes he must go the wrong way to get her back.

A fun read about leprechauns, friendship, and courage. I found the message of the book very inspiring. The characters were amazing, in particular Baylee. Kids will love this!

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Book Review The Failure of University Education for Development & What To Teach Instead

frontcover-the_failure_of_university_education_for_developmentTitle: The Failure of University Education for Development & What To Teach Instead

Author: Samuel A. Odunsi, Sr.

Genre: Nonfiction, education, economics

Finally, a New Big Idea that Solves Our Toughest Problems.

New book by Samuel A. Odunsi, Sr. defines the problem of tacit cultural knowledge in education and how to solve it.

University education may benefit the individual, but it has not led to overall economic development.  For many developing countries, the hope behind university education far exceeds the results. The ideas and solution presented in this book provides a way to equalize the results of university education with the hope and unrealized expectations behind it.

  • Education cannot teach everything about development. The most crucial aspects of development are tacit in nature and cannot be directly expressed or taught. Instead, they are acquired passively in culture.

  • Liberal Education has struggled with this problem. While its lofty goals are well defined, they cannot be met without the tacit knowledge for development, which it can barely define, much less teach.

  • The concept of “Cultural Diversity” recognizes that there are differences between cultures, including tacit cultural knowledge.

  • The tacit knowledge needed for development is not specific knowledge. Instead it is the connection of the elements of the western economic model, that may be learned in school, to the language capacity that all human beings already possess and use for creatively expressing the spoken language.

  • This is why expatriates from the West and the developed countries of Asia often perform successfully as managers and entrepreneurs in the developing countries, despite the constraints of underdevelopment. To them, the elements of the economic model are merely vocabulary to be expressed as management, administration, or entrepreneurship, using the language capacity.

  • The purpose of university education should be to connect technical knowledge about economic development with the language capacity that students already possess. In the same way that the human language capacity can be repurposed for the use of a second language. Graduates can then express the economic model with the versatility and creativity they already use for expressing the spoken language.

  • The means for achieving this purpose is now available and presented in the book and on this site: HumanRethink.net.

  • Help bring real change to our world. Make it happen now. Contact mail@HumanRethink.net

 

I never really thought about the topic of university education and how it’s so important for development – provided it does its job well. This book explains what is going wrong, why it’s going wrong, and how we can fix it, with a focus on language and culture. A fascinating read.

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